Soft Racism

April 26, 2008 · By

Definition: when the oppressors no longer tell the oppressed that they are too stupid for normal education – it just lets the oppressed say it, then agrees with them.

Just another symptom of a nation that has copped out of caring for its fellow citizens by simply making mental, emotional and psychological problems, a “culture” or a “lifestyle choice“.

Sometimes I despise what Canada has become.

Comments

14 Responses to “Soft Racism”

  1. dalton on April 26th, 2008 1:13 pm [#]

    “When the oppressors no longer tell the oppressed that they are too stupid for normal education – it just lets the oppressed say it, then agrees with them…”

    Could you point me to a quote in which any advocate of this school, “oppressor” or “oppressed” (to use your terminology), suggests this has anything to do with “stupidity”? Or is that simply your “analysis”?

  2. Shane Edwards on April 26th, 2008 1:27 pm [#]

    What would you call it when the position is “these children, because of their race, are incapable of learning in the public school environment”?

    In case I wasn’t being clear, I categorically and fundamentally disagree with them AND the moronic McGuinty government that has consented to this “apartheid-style” educational policy.

  3. dalton on April 26th, 2008 2:03 pm [#]

    So no-one has actually expressed the view you described in your post. It IS simply your interpretation.

    Next question: who are you quoting in your response, when you cite someone, in parenththeses, stating ““these children, because of their race, are incapable of learning in the public school environment”?

    Or is that another invented viewpoint of your own, given additional (if fictitious) authority by pretending it’s a quote?

  4. Shane Edwards on April 26th, 2008 2:22 pm [#]

    Ok, how about you go read the articles that have discussed the reason why this asinine measure was initiated, and tell me the reasons YOU think they are segregating children by race.

    This isn’t French Immersion we are talking about here.

  5. dalton on April 26th, 2008 2:32 pm [#]

    Ah. So you simply invented that “quote”, just as you invented the “too stupid for normal education” quote.

    No problem, Shane: you’re absolutely entitled to those views. I just wanted to confirme that you were not, in fact, actually citing anyone except yourself. Thanks.

  6. neo on April 26th, 2008 10:03 pm [#]

    “dalton whines… So no-one has actually…”

    yeah… keep tellin’ yourself that.

    i sure hope they saved enough spaces at this special school… because once the word gets out, everybody’s obviously gonna want to go there.

    *

  7. dalton on April 27th, 2008 4:13 am [#]

    “yeah… keep tellin’ yourself that.”

    Heh. It seems Shane got his “quote” from the same source Matthew used for his “Expelled” statistics.

  8. Charles Anthony on April 27th, 2008 6:24 am [#]

    Shane,
    It is normal for consumers and suppliers of a service to discriminate. Having diversity and choice in a market is a good thing.

    We live in a world where people are different and they have every right to demand different things. The ONLY person who has the moral right and capability to decide what is good for the individual is that individual himself or his parent. Your post implies otherwise.

    There is nothing holy about the Ontario public school system. Afro-centric people are choosing to create their own afro-centric school and they are welcoming non-afro-centric people to participate.

  9. dalton on April 27th, 2008 6:37 am [#]

    Charles raises a point I was wondering about. Your use of the terms “Apartheid” and “segregation” suggest you’re under the impression that some will be excluded from this school. If that’s your impression, Shane, you’re mistaken.

  10. Shane Edwards on April 27th, 2008 8:01 am [#]

    So let’s get this straight:

    – publicly funded religious schools – not allowed.
    – publicly funded catholic schools – allowed
    – publicly funded race-based schools – allowed

    So it’s ok, just because if a white family wants to send their kid to the “African” school. Yeah right.

    I know you don’t want to see the reasons for this school, Dalton. I know you don’t want to give any credence to something I write so you refuse to read more about it, and instead , to paraphrase, begin commenting, “LA LA LA I CAN’T HEAR SHANE. WHAT’S THAT? I AM SORRY YOUR LIPS ARE MOVING BUT NOTHING IS COMING OUT.” I appreciate your right to live in ignorance. Feel Free.

    But it doesn’t change the facts. The facts are Canadians of African extraction are free to associate in any way they see fit – in private. A few blocks away from me is a Khalsa School, formed by Sikhs as a PRIVATE institution that I have zero problem with. They don’t demand that the public system accomodate them with a separate publicly funded school system.

    Also, uniquely, (and I know you don’t believe me, but denial of the truth of the reported reasons for this school doesn’t constitute argumentation), the reasons for the African school are that there is a higher proportion of failures and dropouts amongst their culture groups in Toronto. Instead of dealing with the real social problems that underly the scholastic symptoms, politicians are choosing to believe that there is something about the public school system that they can’t handle.

    If it is simply a desire to frame their culture in a school system, the solution is private. Otherwise, a change in public policy is needed – it means that Tory was right in supporting religious schools. It means that it should be open season for any people group to get public funding for their own schools.

  11. dalton on April 27th, 2008 8:36 am [#]

    Heh. Be calm, Shane.

    You invented some quotes to support your “argument”, and I just wanted to clarify to your readership that you had done so. I think you may also have been mistaken about who would and wouldn’t be allowed to attend this school (as implied by your choice of the terms Apartheid and Segregation, neither of which apply here). I understand it’s annoying to get challenged when you make stuff up, but the best solution, if you don’t mind a friendly suggestion, is probably NOT to make stuff up.

    I’d be happy to discuss the variables that create a successful learning environment, especially in a setting involving pedagogy and cultural minorities, if you’re interested.

  12. neo on April 27th, 2008 8:47 am [#]

    *
    “dalton aka canadian cynic carps… “Apartheid” and “segregation” suggest you’re under the impression that some will be excluded from this school.”

    geez… do you really think it’s too late for me to beat the rush of middle class non-afrocentric parents who are screaming over to keele & sheppard to enroll their kids?

    damn.

    *

  13. dalton on April 27th, 2008 8:55 am [#]

    Probably not, Neo: opening is more than a year away. And as noted, it seems from the article Shane so kindly linked to that this school will not (Shane’s erroneous suggestion notwithstanding) segregate.

  14. qwerty on May 1st, 2008 3:08 pm [#]

    It was the black community that pushed for the black schools not the government segregating them. The Premier is against this completely but once again the special intrests get what they want and the rest of us need pay for it.

    I cannot wait to hear the excuses made by the black community when the gangs, drugs and violence proliferate through their halls.

    It truly is sad that people are so afraid to call it like it is.